Meet the Trainer – Katharina Danielski

Meet Katharina Danielski, Field Application Scientist at 10x Genomics, who is an organiser and trainer at the EMBL Course: Immune Profiling of Single Cells (10 – 13 February 2020).

 

 

 

What is the greatest benefit of the course for the scientific community?

It provides researchers with an overview of what is currently possible when studying the immune system at the single-cell level. There are so many new technologies and methods available these days that scientists are overwhelmed with keeping track of everything new. The 10x Genomics Single-Cell Immune Profiling solution allows you to study a broad range of aspects all derived from the same single cell: sequence information of paired full-length T cell or B cell receptor transcripts; gene expression profile; cell surface protein markers; antigen specificity. Linking all these pieces of information back to the same cell is opening a lot of new ways to study the adaptive immune response that were just not possible before.

Are the methods used in this course unusual or new?

The ability to study single cells to the extent as it is currently possible with various assays on the market is still very recent. We are only beginning to scratch the surface of the biological information that will be uncovered in the coming years thanks to the methods discussed in this course, among others.

In comparison to other training environments, what do you enjoy most about teaching at EMBL?

I enjoy teaching at EMBL because of the high level of organisation that the EMBL team displays. The EMBL Heidelberg Campus is also a particularly beautiful location situated on top of a hill surrounded by forests. But most importantly: the food in the canteen is legen- wait for it -dary.

What is your number one tip related to the course?

Don’t be shy. The trainers are more than happy to answer your questions and discuss your projects and  experiments…but skip breakfast so you can fill up on lunch at the EMBL Canteen. You will thank me later.

What, in your opinion, is the most crucial scientific discovery of the past 100 years?

I don’t think any single discovery on its own could be labeled as “the most crucial”. Science in the past 100 years has made so many giant leaps for mankind.

Where is science heading in your opinion?

Studying gene expression of (single) cells spatially resolved within their morphological context of an intact tissue section.

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Meet the Trainer – Dr. Anders Ståhlberg

Meet Dr. Anders Ståhlberg, Associate Professor at the University of Gothenburg and  Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden, and organiser of the EMBO Practical Course: Single-Cell Omics (12 – 18 May 2019) and EMBL Course: “Liquid Biopsies” (23 – 28 September 2019).

Anders’ research focuses on basic tumour biology and cancer diagnostics.

What is the greatest benefit of the Liquid Biopsies course for the scientific community?

Liquid biopsy analysis is an emerging tool in biological/medical research as well as in clinical diagnostics. However, most analyses require ultrasensitive methods. In this course we cover both theoretical aspects and practical consideration that need to be addressed to utilise the potential of liquid biopsy analysis, and use both state-of-art techniques and novel approaches.

What could the techniques in this course be used for in the bigger picture?

The applied techniques include ultrasensitive analysis of DNA, proteins and single-cells. These techniques can be applied to a wide range of applications in any type of liquid biopsy. In addition, these techniques can be used on any type of challenging sample types. Application areas include cancer, immunology, prenatal testing, forensics, evolution studies, drug screening, pathogen detection and beyond.

In comparison to other training environments, what do you enjoy most about teaching at EMBL?

The superb facilities, including everything from course arrangement to the research lab. However, the best part of EMBL courses is the dynamic interactions between teachers, tutors, staff and all students. It is a perfect environment to network and discuss science.

What is the strangest or funniest thing that has ever happened in a course?

The course dinners are very enjoyable and may end in unexpected but fun ways.

What challenges is your research field facing?

Translating basic research into clinical use.

Where is science heading in your opinion?

The amount of generated data will increase dramatically with all available high-throughput methods. One major challenge is to translate this data into useful information.

What was your first ever job?

I got my first job when I was 15 years old in basic industry, making valves.

If you weren’t a scientist, what would you be?

A teacher or farmer.

What is the greatest risk you’ve ever taken?

In science, saying no to academically rewarding positions and instead following my research interest with an unsure future.

What is your favourite book?

I cannot resist a good fantasy book.

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Meet the Trainer – Estefanía Lozano-Andrés

Meet Estefanía Lozano-Andrés, a Marie Sklodowska-Curie PhD Candidate at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. We first met Estefanía in 2016 when she was a participant at the EMBL Course “Extracellular Vesicles: from Biology to Biomedical Applications” and she is back as a trainer at this year’s course.

What is your research focus, and what challenges is the field facing?

My main research interest is the study of Extracellular Vesicles (EVs), which are nano-sized membrane-enclosed particles released by cells. EVs contain selected proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that reflect the status and origin of cells, making them very attractive for biomarker profiling. However, their small size hampers robust detection of single EVs, so more sensitive technology needs to be developed to truly exploit the potential of EVs. Particularly, I am interested in the use of flow cytometry to analyse EVs in a high-throughput and multiparametric manner, but there are quite some challenges to overcome like the optimisation of EV-labelling strategies, the development of reference materials and the standardisation of measurements.

You attended the EMBL Course on Extracellular Vesicles 3 years ago and now you are one of the trainers in this year’s course. How has the course influenced your career?

The course had a great impact on my scientific career. When I was selected to attend the course, I was at an early stage of my PhD and it helped me to develop as a scientist and to have a more critical eye. Thanks to the course I met many leading researchers in the field and it’s probably one of the reasons why I am currently a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Early Stage Researcher within the TRAIN-EV Consortium, which brings together leading European scientists working on EVs (grant agreement No 722148). I was thrilled to know that this year I could attend the course as a trainer to help all the participants during the practical sessions and to shed some light on the use of flow cytometry for EV analysis.

What is your number one tip for people looking for scientific training?

Don’t be afraid to engage with people, it can really help you to find out about great training opportunities that could further improve your career. And always try to make the most out of any given moment.

If you weren’t a scientist, what would you be?

A multifaceted artist, I love creating things. Painting, writing and photography make me very happy. Fun fact: when I was a child I wanted to be a professional gift wrapper.

If you were a superhero what power would you have?

Teleportation, I would really enjoy to travel across space (and time).

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Meet the Trainer – Andrew Filby

Meet Dr. Andrew Filby, Director of the Flow Cytometry Core Facility at Newcastle University, which supports cutting-edge research through the provision of a comprehensive cytomics resource to both internal and external research groups, operating at the forefront of cytometric applications and method-focused research. Andrew Filby is one of the organisers of the EMBO Practical Course: The Fundamentals of High-End Cell Sorting (11 – 15 November 2019).

What is the greatest benefit of the course for the scientific community?

The ability to physically separate (sort) cells of a particular type or subtype is fundamental in so many biological questions. Teaching and empowering researchers how to do this well is very important.

What could the techniques in this course be used for in the bigger picture?

Cell sorting can be used for so many different reasons, ranging from basic discovery research right through to clinical trials and cell therapies.

Are the methods used in this course unusual or new?

Cell sorting has been around since the 1960s and the principles remain quite stable. However, in this course we teach students the practical as well as the theoretical aspects. The course is run by experts in the field and in a “real world” environment where attendees will be trained in two functioning flow cytometry/cell sorting core facilities.

In comparison to other training environments, what do you enjoy most about teaching at EMBL?

Everything about EMBL is set up for delivering excellent training in biological sciences and in particular the practical, hands-on elements. The training labs are amazing spaces and looked after very well. The canteen is also a highlight!

What is your number one tip related to the course?

Roll your sleeves up and get involved. Ask questions and interact with your trainers as much as possible.

What is your research focus, in 15 words or less?

I want to measure everything about every cell in the body!

What challenges is your research field facing?

The data we generate now is very complex. We have thousands of measurements on millions of cells, sometimes with image and spatial information too. The informatics skills and solutions needed can be immense.

What, in your opinion, is the most crucial scientific discovery of the past 100 years?

The invention of the cell sorter!

If you were a superhero what power would you have?

I would like to shrink myself so that I could travel around the human body and see the cells and processes for myself.

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Meet the Trainer – Toby Hodges

Today we meet Toby Hodges from EMBL Heidelberg, who is an organiser and trainer at the upcoming EMBL Course: Computing Skills for Reproducible Research: Software Carpentry (16 – 18 October 2019). At EMBL, Toby supports EMBL’s bioinformaticians, providing training, advice, community building events and resources for computational science.

What is the greatest benefit of the course for the scientific community?

Computational research skills have never been in greater demand, particularly in the biological sciences. To meet this demand, many researchers must learn programming, command line computing, and other techniques required for data analysis. This Software Carpentry course provides a solid foundation for these skills, teaching researchers good practices in software and analysis pipeline development. The skills and experience that researchers gain by participating in the course will promote high-quality, efficient, and reproducible computational science.

What could the techniques in this course be used for in the bigger picture?

Almost anything! Command line computing, programming, and the other skills taught in the course are becoming vital in most areas of biology but are also widely applicable in a lot of other sectors and career paths – web design, journalism, politics, you name it! Of course, we hope that every researcher who attends our workshops will go on to a long and wildly successful research career but, should they choose to go in a different direction, we’re sure that the skills taught here will still prove beneficial.

Are the methods used in this course unusual or new?

New? Certainly not – most of the tools and techniques taught in our course have existed for many years already. What’s unusual, though, is for biologists and bioinformaticians to have the understanding of good practices in software development and workflow management that the workshop provides. Unfortunately, there’s still a lot of poorly-documented and poorly-written scientific software out there. Once they’ve attended our workshop, researchers will be better able to ensure that the programs and pipelines that they create are reproducible and reusable.

In comparison to other training environments, what do you enjoy most about teaching at EMBL?

It’s helpful for us to teach in a relatively informal environment. We find that, when course participants are relaxed, it creates a positive environment in which they can learn. We’re also privileged to have access to such great teaching facilities and to have excellent support from our colleagues in EMBL’s Course and Conference Office, who make it very easy for us to teach these courses.

What is your number one tip related to the course?

Make the most of it, both as an opportunity to learn from the trainers and as a chance to develop your network. The coffee and lunch breaks are a great chance to get to know your fellow course-mates, to share ideas and experiences, and to learn more about everyone else’s journey to this point.

What challenges is your research field facing?

It’s becoming increasingly important to think about how we manage our research data. The volume of data produced in a typical experiment has become enormous in recent years and we’re scrambling to catch up. It’s vital that our research data is well-annotated and retrievable so that others can re-use it and reproduce our results in the future, but ensuring this can be challenging. The other major challenge to my work is the sheer volume of different research techniques, tools, and data formats being used in modern biology. Bioinformatics has such a diverse ecosystem of tools and file formats, which is developing at a breathtaking pace. It can be difficult to stay up-to-date.

Where is science heading in your opinion?

The future of biological research will increasingly involve the integration of many different types and formats of data into a single experiment or study. We already see this in multi-omics studies and the increasing combination of imaging and single-cell sequencing techniques and I expect the trend to continue towards these integrated approaches.

What was your first ever job?

Stacking shelves in a supermarket.

If you were a superhero what power would you have?

If I could choose: the ability to never make a typo. If I don’t get to choose then, sadly, it would probably be deafeningly loud voice.

 What is your bucket list for the next 12 months?

After a very hectic few years, my main target for 2019 is to get better at saying “no” to things.

What is your favourite recipe?

Michael Chu’s Classic Tiramisu: http://www.cookingforengineers.com/recipe/60/The-Classic-Tiramisu-original-recipe

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